Skip to main content
Bookshelf

Applied Physical Sciences — Graduate Course Listing

APPL590: Design and Making for Researchers
Design thinking is a popular buzz term in this age of Kickstarter, instant turnaround, and short time-to-market.  But what is design thinking really all about?   In many ways, it is a process that most of us were quite familiar with in our preschool years.  Observe an opportunity.  Take an action.  Assess the results. Laugh at the failures. Repeat.  In this graduate-level course, we will parallel the discovery process taught in APPL110 – learning about human-centered design, needs identification, and the iterative design and prototyping process.  In addition, we will provide practical overviews on several technical areas common to many research laboratories such as hardware selection, gas and liquid management, material compatibilities, electronics and data acquisition, etc.  In addition to the BeAM makerspace focused skills development activities conducted in APPL110, students will work on a personal project related to their work in the laboratory or research topic.

MTSC 710 — Materials Science First Year Seminar: Resources for Success in Your PhD Program
1 Credit.
This course is required for first year MTSC students. It is designed to expose students to APS research and key resources and skills outside of course work that they will need to be successful in the PhD program and beyond. Sessions will include research talks by APS faculty, workshops by invited speakers internal and external to UNC, and presentations by second year PhD students.
Grading status: Letter grade.

MTSC 711 — Materials Science First Year Seminar: Developing your Plan for Success
1 Credit.
This is a required course for first-year MTSC graduate students. Students gain knowledge and learn key skillsets outside of their technical course work needed for success in their PhD program and beyond. MTSC711 follows on the topics learned in MTSC710 to broaden the professional development of materials science PhD students. Students work to develop an Individual Development Plan, to understand the variety of career paths available for PhD-holders, and to practice research presentations.
Grading status: Letter grade.

MTSC 712 — Introduction to Convergent Engineering
3 Credits.
Take-home and in-class activities, group discussion and problem-solving coaching will enhance student understanding of how chemistry, physics, materials science and biology are applied to engineering. There will be special focus on BioEngineering, Chemical, Mechanical and Environmental Engineering. Discussions of relevant scientific literature introduce each topic. Guest lecturers and faculty will provide perspectives in fields like mathematical modeling, mechanical engineering or circuit design so students gain a true interdisciplinary view of topics.
Grading status: Letter grade.

MTSC 718 — Seminar in Materials Science and Engineering
1 Credit.
This is a required course for all Materials Science students in fall and spring semesters of years 2-5 of their doctoral program. The course tracks attendance at the required APS departmental seminars. Attending departmental seminars is an important component of training for MTSC doctoral students. Engaging in the seminars will help students gain a working knowledge of a variety of research areas important to their doctoral research.
Grading status: Pass/Fail.

MTSC 740 — Advanced Biomaterials
3 Credits.

Medical or dental implants or explants are highlighted from textbooks, scientific literature, and personal accounts.
Requisites: Prerequisite, BMME 510; Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.
Same as: BMME 740.

MTSC 745 — Chemistry of Biomaterials
3 Credits.

Focuses on the chemistry and chemical structure-function relationships of soft synthetic biological materials. Topics include chemistry of proteins, peptides, nucleic acids, polysaccharides and lipids, and their incorporation into biomaterials and biosensors; enzymatic reactions; chemical modification of organic and inorganic surfaces using self-assembled monolayer chemistries, bioconjugation chemistries, synthesis of nanoparticles and their application as sensors, application of biological materials for logic operations, fundamentals of supramolecular chemistry.ental implants or explants are highlighted from textbooks, scientific literature, and personal accounts.

MTSC 750 — Kinetics, Diffusion, and Phase Transitions of Materials
3 Credits.

Reaction kinetics in bulk materials. Mass transport, microstructural transformations, and phase transitions in condensed phases. Atom diffusion in solids. Spinodal decomposition.

MTSC 755 – Polymer Processing and Properties
3 Credits.

How does one process ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene into ultra-strong fibers or how would you design a polymer shape-memory actuator? Polymer chemistry is important but equally important is the way how polymers are processed. In this course we will discuss the relationship between polymer chemistry, processing and the final, after processing, properties. We will discuss different processing methods that are currently in use) and which parameters play a role in controlling the final properties.

MTSC 765 — Electronic Materials and Devices – Organic and Inorganic
3 Credits.

The course introduces the electronic and optical processes in organic molecules and polymers that govern the behavior of practical organic optoelectronic devices. The course begins with an overview of fundamental science of electronic materials and devices. We then discuss their optoelectronic properties of organic molecules, including topics from photophysics, charge transport and injection. Emphasis will be equally placed on the use of both inorganic and organic electronic materials in organic electronic devices.
Prerequisites: No prerequisites

MTSC 780 — Advanced Materials Science
3 Credits.

This course covers the physical fundamentals of material science with an in-depth discussion of structure formation in soft and hard materials and how structure determines material mechanical, electrical, thermal, and optical properties. Topics include amorphous and crystal structures, defects, dislocation theory, thermodynamics and phase diagrams, diffusion, interfaces and microstructures, solidification, and theory of phase transformation. Special emphasis will be on the structure-property relationships of (bio)polymers, (nano)composites, and their structure property relationships
Grading status: Letter grade.

MTSC 785 — Scientific Computing for Material Science
3 Credits.

This course covers the physical fundamentals of material science with in-depth development of the principles controlling the formation of the structure of engineering materials. Topics include crystal structures, defects, dislocation theory, thermodynamics and phase diagrams, diffusion, interfaces and microstructures, solidification and theory of phase transformation, and physical properties of hard and soft materials.
Grading status: Letter grade.

MTSC 810 — Device Physics and Electronic Properties of Solids
3 Credits.

Survey of crystal structure, bandstructure, transport. Overview of FETs, heterostructures, light emission, dissipation, noise, integrated circuits, solar cells, and ceramics. Emphasis on physical sources of device behavior.
Requisites: Prerequisites, APPL 470 or PHYS 573, MTSC 615, and 730; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisites.

MTSC 820 — Optical Properties of Solids
3 Credits.

Reflection, waveguides, nonlinear optics, optical switching, photorefraction, optical storage. Optical coupling to electronic states, device applications, optical computing.
Requisites: Prerequisites, APPL 470 or PHYS 573, and PHYS 415; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisites.

MTSC 830 — Ion-Solid Interactions
3 Credits.

Interatomic potentials, range distribution, radiation damage, annealing, secondary defects, analytical techniques, silicon-based devices, implantation in compound semiconductors, and buried layer synthesis. Ion implantation in metals, ceramics, polymers, and biomaterials.
Requisites: Prerequisite, APPL 470 or PHYS 573; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.

MTSC 840 — New Technologies and Device Architecture
3 Credits.

Survey of novel and emerging device technologies. Resonant tunneling transistors, HEMT, opto-electronic devices and optical communication and computation, low-temperature electronic, hybrid superconductor devices.
Requisites: Prerequisites, APPL 470 or PHYS 573, MTSC 615, and 730; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisites.

MTSC 871 — Solid State Physics
3 Credits.

Equivalent experience for students lacking the prerequisite. Topics considered include those of PHYS 573, but at a more advanced level, and in addition a detailed discussion of the interaction of waves (electromagnetic, elastic, and electron waves) with periodic structures, e.g., X-ray diffraction, phonons, band theory of metals and semiconductors.
Requisites: Prerequisite, PHYS 321.
Same as: PHYS 871.

MTSC 872 — Solid State Physics
3 Credits.

Topics considered include those of PHYS 573, but at a more advanced level, and in addition a detailed discussion of the interaction of waves (electromagnetic, elastic, and electron waves) with periodic structures, e.g., X-ray diffraction, phonons, band theory of metals and semiconductors.
Requisites: Prerequisite, PHYS 321.
Same as: PHYS 872.

MTSC 994 — Doctoral Research and Dissertation
3 Credits.

Permission of the department.
Repeat rules: May be repeated for credit.