Skip to main content

EMERGE

The Entrepreneurially Minded Engineering Resource Group for Educators (EMERGE) is a community of faculty and staff who are starting or have recently started new engineering programs, departments, and colleges. If you are interested in joining, contact us at EMERGE@unc.edu.

Goals

Through workshops, dialogue, stories and collegial gatherings, the EMERGE is intended to:

  • Forge community between faculty from new and emerging engineering programs who hope to learn from and with each other.
  • Create opportunities to share and reflect on your program’s mission and values, and explore strategies to align the mission and values with your program’s implementation and culture.
  • Help participants explore and apply tools and resources to support a culture of innovation, integration, and development of an entrepreneurial mindset in students.

Who should join?

EMERGE is designed for institutional teams of at least two people who are working together on the development of your engineering program. These teams can be comprised of faculty, staff, and administrators from your institution. However, if only one person from your institution can participate, this will still be a useful experience for your program.

Upcoming Workshops

For Spring 2022, we are planning a monthly series of virtual workshops with the following formats:

Relationship & Network Building: These one-hour sessions would have a standard format of sharing successes and challenges unfolding organically from introduction questions to develop an effective program. By utilizing breakout rooms, faculty members can collaborate, problem-solve, and brainstorm ideas and solutions to better their developing program.
Capacity Building: In a more structured setting, these one-hour sessions will focus on building capacity around themes from the Fall 2021 meetings. It includes a mixture of content delivery, individual work with frameworks, and work in cross-institutional groups. With light coaching and Olin conversation partners, participants will consider how they will incorporate these frameworks into their developing programs.

Following each of these sessions, we will have an additional (optional) 30 minutes for further conversation.

Dates:

Friday, February 11, 2022, 2:00 – 3:00 PM ET

EMERGE Relationship & Network Building

This is a one hour session, and we will stay online for an additional 30 minutes for those who are interested in continuing the conversation.

Register

Friday, March 11, 2022, 2:00 – 3:00 PM ET

EMERGE Capacity Building

This is a one hour session, and we will stay online for an additional 30 minutes for those who are interested in continuing the conversation.

Register

Friday, April 8, 2022, 2:00 – 3:00 PM ET

EMERGE Relationship & Network Building

This is a one hour session, and we will stay online for an additional 30 minutes for those who are interested in continuing the conversation.

Register

May 2022 – Date and Time TBD

EMERGE Capacity Building

This is a one-hour session, and we will stay online for an additional 30 minutes for those who are interested in continuing the conversation.

Registration will open in April 2022.

Olin EMERGE Facilitators

Dr. Scott Hersey is an Assistant Professor of Chemical and Environmental Engineering at Olin College of Engineering, and is the director of Olin’s Senior Capstone Program in Engineering (SCOPE). His external impact work focuses on using tools from atmospheric chemistry and environmental engineering to equip advocacy groups and elected officials to catalyze improved air health in vulnerable communities. He has delivered workshops, engaged in consulting, and facilitated retreats around topics ranging from goals-driven project and curriculum design to fostering identity development through communities of practice. After receiving a PhD from Caltech, he spent 3 years engaging in community-based development work in heavily polluted townships and informal settlements in South Africa, where he was thoroughly seduced by human-centered design and the social sciences as essential components of achieving impact and creating value with engineering and science practice. This disciplinary integration is core to his approach as an educator and researcher.

Dr. Robert Martello is a Professor of the History of Science and Technology at Olin College of Engineering. He has chaired and initiated efforts that re-imagined Olin’s faculty reappointment and promotion, institutional outreach, curricular innovation, and student assessment approaches. Professor Martello’s NSF-sponsored research, engineering education publications, and faculty development workshops explore connections between interdisciplinary integration, faculty teaming, student motivation, and project-based learning. He has delivered educational workshops for audiences around the world that include instructors and administrators at all levels. Professor Martello implements his findings in experimental courses such as “The Stuff of History,” “Six Microbes that Changed the World,” and “Chemistry in Context.” A graduate of MIT’s program in the History and Social Study of Science and Technology, he is the author of Midnight Ride, Industrial Dawn: Paul Revere and the Growth of American Enterprise, and he regularly lectures on Paul Revere and Ben Franklin, our “Founding Makers,” for audiences of all ages and backgrounds.

Dr. Jessica Townsend is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering and the Interim Academic Vice President for External Engagement at Olin College. Since joining the Olin College faculty in 2004, Dr. Townsend has worked as a facilitator and consultant with universities and professional organizations looking to improve engineering student engagement. She currently oversees institutional-level strategy for Olin’s external educational change mission and has contributed to the development of innovative pedagogies, courses, and curricula at Olin College. Her technical area of interest is experimental thermal-fluids and she worked for many years on the development and characterization of nanofluids for thermal management applications. Dr. Townsend has industry experience in both air-breathing propulsion, as a gas turbine performance engineer at Hamilton Sundstrand Power Systems, and in rocket propulsion, as a visiting engineer at Blue Origin, a commercial spaceflight company based in Seattle, WA.

For more information about the entrepreneurial mindset in engineering education, visit https://engineeringunleashed.com.
The EMERGE program is supported by funding from the Kern Family Foundation.
For any further questions, contact EMERGE@unc.edu.